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Top Health News & Info

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 22:59:04 -0500

The U.S. National Toxicology Program has added 8 substances to its list of known or probable carcinogens. Nearly everyone is exposed to many of these things, but mostly in tiny amounts.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 21:44:52 -0500

A promising blood test for lung injury may also predict heart attack and stroke risk as well as death from cardiovascular causes.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 20:19:24 -0500

A new study is providing clues to the role of nicotine in reducing appetite. Researchers have zeroed in on the exact brain cells that nicotine triggers to cut appetite and body fat.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 19:38:03 -0500

WebMD asked stroke rehab experts to describe the types of exercises that are used to help stroke survivors regain the use of their affected arm.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 19:34:30 -0500

WebMD answers questions about what to expect following a stroke, from recovery and rehab to preventing future strokes and finding support.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 19:32:48 -0500

WebMD discusses habits that may be hurting your teeth.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 19:21:07 -0500

If you've already had a stroke, preventing a second one is a top priority. WebMD checks with the experts and offers lifestyle tips that can help prevent future strokes.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 18:59:32 -0500

Caring for a loved one who has had a stroke can be a daunting task. WebMD asked experts what caregivers need to know. Here are their caregiving tips.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 18:56:05 -0500

WebMD talked with experts to find out what kinds of medications are used to help patients who develop spasticity after a stroke regain control over their arm movements.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 18:19:39 -0500

A new study suggests seeing the color red makes muscles move faster and with more force, a finding that could have important implications in sports and other activities where a quick burst of energy is needed.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 16:55:13 -0500

WebMD offers strategies for dealing with your little picky eater. Discover reasons why kids disregard healthy foods and find tips for helping them widen the variety of foods they will eat.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 16:53:45 -0500

WebMD shows ideas for a healthy breakfast you can make quickly in the morning.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 00:25:21 -0500

Flu vaccination rates remained high during the 2010-2011 flu season, according to data in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 23:36:47 -0500

More than 1 billion people in the world are living with some form of disability, and governments everywhere need to beef up efforts to help them, according to a new report.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 23:19:05 -0500

The prostate drugs Proscar, Avodart, and Jalyn and the hair-loss drug Propecia add to the risk of high-grade prostate cancer.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 20:15:28 -0500

WebMD talks to experts about treatment options for TMJ or other temporomandibular disorders

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 19:34:41 -0500

Heat waves, floods, and other extreme weather conditions may affect indoor air quality and increase the risk of health problems, according to a new report issued by the Institute of Medicine.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 16:28:13 -0500

Mineral makeup is more than just a new beauty trend – it claims health benefits for skin as well. But is it really help – or hype?

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 00:34:35 -0500

Close to 70,000 heart failure deaths could be prevented in the U.S. each year if more patients were on recommended therapies, new research suggests.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 00:07:04 -0500

People who continue to engage in moderate to intense exercise as they age may be less likely to develop the small brain lesions commonly referred to as silent strokes, new research suggests.

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 23:30:27 -0500

Genetic mutations not inherited from parents appear to explain some cases of autism, new research suggests. And the mutations may number in the hundreds.

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 22:58:44 -0500

The FDA has found "very low levels" of a cancer-causing form of arsenic in the livers of chickens fed the widely used arsenic drug 3-Nitro or Roxarsone. Pfizer will suspend U.S. sales of the drug in 30 days.

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 21:42:56 -0500

Due to muscle injury risk, the FDA says no new patients should start taking the 80 mg dose of the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin (found in Zocor, Vytorin, and Simcor).

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 21:00:20 -0500

WebMD provides ideas for healthy snacks kids can enjoy at home or at school.

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 20:59:13 -0500

Are your kids getting enough of these four essential nutrients often missing from kids' diets?

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Chaldean Moms Give Great Advice
By Latifa Seeba :: Wednesday, March 11, 2009 :: 19072 Views :: Article Rating :: Health & Fitness, Community & Culture

“I was scared and worried,” says Ashley Michael.  “My baby would not stop crying.  It was late at night and I was so tired.  He was getting on my nerves.  Thank God we lived with my Mother-in-Law.  She helped keep me calm and made me feel that everything would be fine.  She was so kind and helpful.”

All babies cry. And at about two weeks of age, it is common for babies to develop a fussy period in the evening that can last for as long as two hours.  Fortunately for Mrs. Michael it is a Chaldean tradition for a new mom to stay with her mother or mother-in-law after giving birth for a few months.   

The reassurance, extra set of hands, and experienced advice can make all the difference.  So can a number of these helpful tips given to www.CHALDEAN.org by experienced Chaldean moms on how to soothe a fussy baby.  Try some of the following techniques, or perhaps a combination of them, to soothe your baby.

It goes without saying that moms should always check fussy babies and determine if they need to be changed, need to be fed, or are hurt and nursing an injury in some way.  Just remember, when trying to comfort your baby pay attention to what your baby is trying to tell you. Through trial and error, and with loving patience, you'll soon discover together which soothing methods work best.

Mari Hanoodi, mother of six, says babies like to be warm and snuggled like they were in the womb.  She suggests new Chaldean mothers try to:

  • The Chaldean tight swaddle.  Wrapping the baby tightly in a receiving blanket help keeps them warm and snug.
  • Use your body warmth to comfort the baby by holding the baby close. 
  • Place a heating pad in your baby's sleep area to warm the sheets before putting them down. Be sure to take out the heating pad and check the temperature of the sheets to be sure they're comfortably warm.
  • Lay your baby facedown over a wrapped hot-water bottle on your lap.

Ibtissam Salem, mother of eight and grandmother of twelve, says soothingly touches help them relax.  She suggests:

  • Massage firmly but gently your baby's back from the neck down to his bottom.
  • Pat or rub your baby on his back firmly.
  • In a warm room, lay your baby on their back on a firm surface and gently massage his tummy with clockwise strokes. If you think his discomfort may be resulting from gas, this can help move down the gas. Then gently press his knees into his abdomen to push out the gas. 

Amy Gessu, mother of three and singer in her church choir favors singing and speaking to the baby to help them relax.  She recommends:

  • Chaldean moms hum and sing familiar songs you enjoy.
  • Mothers should use reassuring words in a soft, low voice.
  • Moms can make a tape recording of a dishwasher, washing machine, vacuum cleaner or clothes dryer to let your baby hear repeated swooshing sounds.
  • A fan or humidifier in the baby's room can sometimes do the trick, as can a radio tuned to the static between stations.
  • Soft music like classical, soft rock, country, or soft jazz music is best. No heavy metal, rap, or hard rock - it makes babies nervous.

Movement and how you hold your baby is what mother’s Nehla Garmo, Christina Eisho, and Dalia Daoud suggest.  They advise:

  • Chaldean moms to hold their baby facedown over their forearm with their head at your elbow and your thumb and fingers wrapped around his thigh.
  • Hold your baby seated in your hand with his back to your chest and your other hand across his chest, wrapping your thumb and fingers around his upper arm and gently sway.
  • Holding the baby high over your shoulder so his stomach is being pressed into your shoulder bone and slowly bring them down to a firm hug.
  • Cradle your baby in your arms, holding him tummy-to-tummy tightly against you as you walk.
  • Swaying side to side or back and forth while standing up.
  • Rocking back and forth in a comfortable rocking chair.

Perhaps these tips will help keep your fussy bundle of joy sleeping through the night. If Chaldean mothers reading this article have other tips, please send them along to  info@chaldean.org.