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Fri, 10 Jun 2011 22:59:04 -0500

The U.S. National Toxicology Program has added 8 substances to its list of known or probable carcinogens. Nearly everyone is exposed to many of these things, but mostly in tiny amounts.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 21:44:52 -0500

A promising blood test for lung injury may also predict heart attack and stroke risk as well as death from cardiovascular causes.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 20:19:24 -0500

A new study is providing clues to the role of nicotine in reducing appetite. Researchers have zeroed in on the exact brain cells that nicotine triggers to cut appetite and body fat.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 19:38:03 -0500

WebMD asked stroke rehab experts to describe the types of exercises that are used to help stroke survivors regain the use of their affected arm.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 19:34:30 -0500

WebMD answers questions about what to expect following a stroke, from recovery and rehab to preventing future strokes and finding support.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 19:32:48 -0500

WebMD discusses habits that may be hurting your teeth.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 19:21:07 -0500

If you've already had a stroke, preventing a second one is a top priority. WebMD checks with the experts and offers lifestyle tips that can help prevent future strokes.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 18:59:32 -0500

Caring for a loved one who has had a stroke can be a daunting task. WebMD asked experts what caregivers need to know. Here are their caregiving tips.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 18:56:05 -0500

WebMD talked with experts to find out what kinds of medications are used to help patients who develop spasticity after a stroke regain control over their arm movements.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 18:19:39 -0500

A new study suggests seeing the color red makes muscles move faster and with more force, a finding that could have important implications in sports and other activities where a quick burst of energy is needed.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 16:55:13 -0500

WebMD offers strategies for dealing with your little picky eater. Discover reasons why kids disregard healthy foods and find tips for helping them widen the variety of foods they will eat.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 16:53:45 -0500

WebMD shows ideas for a healthy breakfast you can make quickly in the morning.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 00:25:21 -0500

Flu vaccination rates remained high during the 2010-2011 flu season, according to data in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 23:36:47 -0500

More than 1 billion people in the world are living with some form of disability, and governments everywhere need to beef up efforts to help them, according to a new report.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 23:19:05 -0500

The prostate drugs Proscar, Avodart, and Jalyn and the hair-loss drug Propecia add to the risk of high-grade prostate cancer.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 20:15:28 -0500

WebMD talks to experts about treatment options for TMJ or other temporomandibular disorders

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 19:34:41 -0500

Heat waves, floods, and other extreme weather conditions may affect indoor air quality and increase the risk of health problems, according to a new report issued by the Institute of Medicine.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 16:28:13 -0500

Mineral makeup is more than just a new beauty trend – it claims health benefits for skin as well. But is it really help – or hype?

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 00:34:35 -0500

Close to 70,000 heart failure deaths could be prevented in the U.S. each year if more patients were on recommended therapies, new research suggests.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 00:07:04 -0500

People who continue to engage in moderate to intense exercise as they age may be less likely to develop the small brain lesions commonly referred to as silent strokes, new research suggests.

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 23:30:27 -0500

Genetic mutations not inherited from parents appear to explain some cases of autism, new research suggests. And the mutations may number in the hundreds.

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 22:58:44 -0500

The FDA has found "very low levels" of a cancer-causing form of arsenic in the livers of chickens fed the widely used arsenic drug 3-Nitro or Roxarsone. Pfizer will suspend U.S. sales of the drug in 30 days.

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 21:42:56 -0500

Due to muscle injury risk, the FDA says no new patients should start taking the 80 mg dose of the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin (found in Zocor, Vytorin, and Simcor).

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 21:00:20 -0500

WebMD provides ideas for healthy snacks kids can enjoy at home or at school.

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 20:59:13 -0500

Are your kids getting enough of these four essential nutrients often missing from kids' diets?

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Chaldean Healthcare Provider Sees Shift in Culture Costing A Great Deal
By Britney Hermiz :: Tuesday, November 04, 2008 :: 18810 Views :: Article Rating :: Health & Fitness, Government & Society

Florida, USA – “The family is the nucleus of society.  When it is weakened or destroyed, we all pay,” says Jenny Jabril, a Chaldean nurse in Florida’s Orange County.  “We all pay when families break-down or fail.  We the people, deal with the dysfunction.  Our taxes go up to care for the abandoned or misguided children, our education system spins out of control, we pay more to prevent crimes, protect our families, or hospitalize these people.” 

Jabril is frustrated over the increased number of substance abuse.  In Florida law, citizens can be held against their will under the Marchman Act. Individuals whose substance abuse makes them a threat to themselves or others can be held at a mental-health facility for up to five days while physicians evaluate them.

Jerry Kassab, president and chief executive officer of Lakeside Alternatives, Orange County's receiving center, said his facility receives about 20 patients a day who are committed under the law.   There are three scenarios in which someone can be committed under the Marchman Act.

In Orange County, Kassab said, most patients are taken to Lakeside by law enforcement officers.  "The most common instance is when someone's out on the street who's acting up, or the police might be called by a store owner because someone's acting up or acting weird," Kassab said. "You also get instances when one family member calls the police because someone in their family is out of control."

That number has increased during the past five years, Kassab said, as law-enforcement culture has shifted toward the belief a hospital is better than a jail.  "This doesn't show up on their records," Kassab said. "It's a good thing to have them receive treatment rather than jail."

Patients can also be committed by a licensed mental-health counselor or physician. According to Kassab, family members sometimes come to Lakeside with patients who don't want to enter the facility voluntarily. If they meet the criteria for involuntary commitment, the center's staff can commit them.

A family member or friend also can seek a court order for someone to be committed. To do that, an individual fills out a petition form and signs it under oath at a county clerk's office. A judge then decides, based solely on the petition, whether the patient meets the criteria.  If the petition is persuasive, the judge enters an order and informs law enforcement officers, who take the patient to a receiving center.

The goal of the Marchman Act commitments is to evaluate patients and persuade them to enter an outpatient treatment program.  "We sit down with them and try to set up an appointment and a plan that they'll keep, but so many don't, and that's just a fact of it," Kassab said.

After the designated evaluation period has passed, physicians at the receiving center can petition the court to hold a patient longer, often just for a few days; but in a few instances, they may ask the court for permission to move the patient to a state-run hospital.

In both instances, the hearings usually take place right at the receiving center, and the patient is represented by a public defender.

"The public defender is very opposed many times, because they believe it's a violation of their civil rights," Kassab said. "Our doctors want to keep them because they believe it's in their best interest."

When the court does decide in the favor of the receiving center, the patient's lawyer often appeals the ruling -- and usually the appeals court will side with the patient, Lenderman said.

Jabril says, “It's a balancing act between a person's liberty and their safety and the safety of the community.  All of this has come about because of the family breaking down. Our healthcare costs have skyrocketed and it has forced other families to pay for the lack of personal responsibility by those who are alcoholic, using drugs, or becoming mentally ill due to a parents STD.”