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Fri, 10 Jun 2011 22:59:04 -0500

The U.S. National Toxicology Program has added 8 substances to its list of known or probable carcinogens. Nearly everyone is exposed to many of these things, but mostly in tiny amounts.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 21:44:52 -0500

A promising blood test for lung injury may also predict heart attack and stroke risk as well as death from cardiovascular causes.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 20:19:24 -0500

A new study is providing clues to the role of nicotine in reducing appetite. Researchers have zeroed in on the exact brain cells that nicotine triggers to cut appetite and body fat.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 19:38:03 -0500

WebMD asked stroke rehab experts to describe the types of exercises that are used to help stroke survivors regain the use of their affected arm.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 19:34:30 -0500

WebMD answers questions about what to expect following a stroke, from recovery and rehab to preventing future strokes and finding support.

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Fri, 10 Jun 2011 19:21:07 -0500

If you've already had a stroke, preventing a second one is a top priority. WebMD checks with the experts and offers lifestyle tips that can help prevent future strokes.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 18:59:32 -0500

Caring for a loved one who has had a stroke can be a daunting task. WebMD asked experts what caregivers need to know. Here are their caregiving tips.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 18:56:05 -0500

WebMD talked with experts to find out what kinds of medications are used to help patients who develop spasticity after a stroke regain control over their arm movements.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 18:19:39 -0500

A new study suggests seeing the color red makes muscles move faster and with more force, a finding that could have important implications in sports and other activities where a quick burst of energy is needed.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 16:55:13 -0500

WebMD offers strategies for dealing with your little picky eater. Discover reasons why kids disregard healthy foods and find tips for helping them widen the variety of foods they will eat.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 16:53:45 -0500

WebMD shows ideas for a healthy breakfast you can make quickly in the morning.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 00:25:21 -0500

Flu vaccination rates remained high during the 2010-2011 flu season, according to data in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 23:36:47 -0500

More than 1 billion people in the world are living with some form of disability, and governments everywhere need to beef up efforts to help them, according to a new report.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 23:19:05 -0500

The prostate drugs Proscar, Avodart, and Jalyn and the hair-loss drug Propecia add to the risk of high-grade prostate cancer.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 20:15:28 -0500

WebMD talks to experts about treatment options for TMJ or other temporomandibular disorders

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 19:34:41 -0500

Heat waves, floods, and other extreme weather conditions may affect indoor air quality and increase the risk of health problems, according to a new report issued by the Institute of Medicine.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 16:28:13 -0500

Mineral makeup is more than just a new beauty trend – it claims health benefits for skin as well. But is it really help – or hype?

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 00:34:35 -0500

Close to 70,000 heart failure deaths could be prevented in the U.S. each year if more patients were on recommended therapies, new research suggests.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 00:07:04 -0500

People who continue to engage in moderate to intense exercise as they age may be less likely to develop the small brain lesions commonly referred to as silent strokes, new research suggests.

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 23:30:27 -0500

Genetic mutations not inherited from parents appear to explain some cases of autism, new research suggests. And the mutations may number in the hundreds.

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 22:58:44 -0500

The FDA has found "very low levels" of a cancer-causing form of arsenic in the livers of chickens fed the widely used arsenic drug 3-Nitro or Roxarsone. Pfizer will suspend U.S. sales of the drug in 30 days.

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 21:42:56 -0500

Due to muscle injury risk, the FDA says no new patients should start taking the 80 mg dose of the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin (found in Zocor, Vytorin, and Simcor).

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 21:00:20 -0500

WebMD provides ideas for healthy snacks kids can enjoy at home or at school.

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 20:59:13 -0500

Are your kids getting enough of these four essential nutrients often missing from kids' diets?

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Chaldeans Concerned over Red Meat Link to Cancer
By Britney Hermiz :: Sunday, December 16, 2007 :: 15779 Views :: Article Rating :: Health & Fitness

California, USA - Chaldeans who eat a lot of red meat and processed meats have a significantly higher risk of several types of cancer, including lung cancer and colorectal cancer, says Dr. Tarik Kajy, a Chaldean cancer specialist and surgeon.  A recent study released by U.S. researchers concur with Dr. Kajy that high red meat consummation is a health risk.  

The study is the first big study to show a link between meat and lung cancer. It also shows that people who eat a lot of meat have a higher risk of liver and esophageal cancer and that men raise their risk of pancreatic cancer by eating red meat.

A growing number of Chaldeans in America are being diagnosed with cancer.  Dr. Kajy theorizes that high red meat consumption in the Chaldean diet might be to blame.  “Chaldeans originating from the Middle East often ate a high vegetarian laden Mediterranean style diet balanced with low meat intake.  However, Chaldeans in America have reversed the portions and are now eating more meat then the traditional vegetable driven meal.”

Dr. Kajy shares that, “The researchers studied 500,000 people aged 50 to 71 for eight years.  They examined 53,396 cases of cancer.  What they discovered was a statistically significant elevated risks (ranging from 20 percent to 60 percent) were evident for esophageal, colorectal, liver, and lung cancer, comparing individuals in the highest with those in the lowest quintile of red meat intake.”

The study revealed that people in the top 20 percent of eating processed meat had a 20 percent higher risk of colorectal cancer -- mostly rectal cancer -- and a 16 percent higher risk for lung cancer.

The study also shows that red meat intake was associated with an elevated risk for cancers of the esophagus and liver.  These differences held even when smoking was accounted for among the cases.  Meats can cause cancer by several routes, the study noted.

“If Chaldean Americans do not return to their traditional roots relating to their diet cancer and obesity will soon become the number one killer in the community,” Dr. Kajy added. 
Meat is a strong source of saturated fat and iron, which have independently been associated with carcinogenesis.  Meat is also a source of several chemicals known to cause DNA mutations, including N-nitroso compounds, heterocyclic amines and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. 

Both the fat and cancer causing chemicals are found in larger quantities in meats that are sold or used in restaurants.  Chaldeans that continue to eat out more run a higher risk of cancer. 

Meat consumption in relation to cancer risk has been reported in over a hundred epidemiological studies from many countries with diverse diets. 

“Chaldeans have been fortunate in America.  The opportunities for a hard-working family to be successful are plenty.  Unfortunately, Chaldeans who find themselves successful tend to eat out more and indulge in foods high in red meat.  That mistake is proving to be deadly as Chaldeans in America far outpace the cancer rate of their cultural relatives in other parts of the world,” says Dr. Kajy. 

Chaldean families recognizing the dangers of red meat are returning to more traditional Chaldean meals and have recommitted to eating out less.