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Top Health News & Info

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 22:59:04 -0500

The U.S. National Toxicology Program has added 8 substances to its list of known or probable carcinogens. Nearly everyone is exposed to many of these things, but mostly in tiny amounts.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 21:44:52 -0500

A promising blood test for lung injury may also predict heart attack and stroke risk as well as death from cardiovascular causes.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 20:19:24 -0500

A new study is providing clues to the role of nicotine in reducing appetite. Researchers have zeroed in on the exact brain cells that nicotine triggers to cut appetite and body fat.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 19:38:03 -0500

WebMD asked stroke rehab experts to describe the types of exercises that are used to help stroke survivors regain the use of their affected arm.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 19:34:30 -0500

WebMD answers questions about what to expect following a stroke, from recovery and rehab to preventing future strokes and finding support.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 19:32:48 -0500

WebMD discusses habits that may be hurting your teeth.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 19:21:07 -0500

If you've already had a stroke, preventing a second one is a top priority. WebMD checks with the experts and offers lifestyle tips that can help prevent future strokes.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 18:59:32 -0500

Caring for a loved one who has had a stroke can be a daunting task. WebMD asked experts what caregivers need to know. Here are their caregiving tips.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 18:56:05 -0500

WebMD talked with experts to find out what kinds of medications are used to help patients who develop spasticity after a stroke regain control over their arm movements.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 18:19:39 -0500

A new study suggests seeing the color red makes muscles move faster and with more force, a finding that could have important implications in sports and other activities where a quick burst of energy is needed.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 16:55:13 -0500

WebMD offers strategies for dealing with your little picky eater. Discover reasons why kids disregard healthy foods and find tips for helping them widen the variety of foods they will eat.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 16:53:45 -0500

WebMD shows ideas for a healthy breakfast you can make quickly in the morning.

Fri, 10 Jun 2011 00:25:21 -0500

Flu vaccination rates remained high during the 2010-2011 flu season, according to data in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 23:36:47 -0500

More than 1 billion people in the world are living with some form of disability, and governments everywhere need to beef up efforts to help them, according to a new report.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 23:19:05 -0500

The prostate drugs Proscar, Avodart, and Jalyn and the hair-loss drug Propecia add to the risk of high-grade prostate cancer.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 20:15:28 -0500

WebMD talks to experts about treatment options for TMJ or other temporomandibular disorders

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 19:34:41 -0500

Heat waves, floods, and other extreme weather conditions may affect indoor air quality and increase the risk of health problems, according to a new report issued by the Institute of Medicine.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 16:28:13 -0500

Mineral makeup is more than just a new beauty trend – it claims health benefits for skin as well. But is it really help – or hype?

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 00:34:35 -0500

Close to 70,000 heart failure deaths could be prevented in the U.S. each year if more patients were on recommended therapies, new research suggests.

Thu, 09 Jun 2011 00:07:04 -0500

People who continue to engage in moderate to intense exercise as they age may be less likely to develop the small brain lesions commonly referred to as silent strokes, new research suggests.

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 23:30:27 -0500

Genetic mutations not inherited from parents appear to explain some cases of autism, new research suggests. And the mutations may number in the hundreds.

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 22:58:44 -0500

The FDA has found "very low levels" of a cancer-causing form of arsenic in the livers of chickens fed the widely used arsenic drug 3-Nitro or Roxarsone. Pfizer will suspend U.S. sales of the drug in 30 days.

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 21:42:56 -0500

Due to muscle injury risk, the FDA says no new patients should start taking the 80 mg dose of the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin (found in Zocor, Vytorin, and Simcor).

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 21:00:20 -0500

WebMD provides ideas for healthy snacks kids can enjoy at home or at school.

Wed, 08 Jun 2011 20:59:13 -0500

Are your kids getting enough of these four essential nutrients often missing from kids' diets?

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9 Terrific Indoor Activities for Chaldean Toddlers
By Neda Ayar :: Friday, November 30, 2007 :: 20645 Views :: Article Rating :: Health & Fitness, Living & Lifestyle

Chaldean parents are curious on how to capture their little one's creative energy when the weather gets cold.  Being cooped up in the house all day can make a toddler honery and troublesome.  Chaldean parents can help channel that energy by trying at least one of our nine fun, brain-boosting projects.

1. Make a Family Album.
Create a family photo album (the 4" x 6" plastic booklets), and gather individual snapshots of all the people you want to include. Put the photo on the right, and on the left insert a 4" x 6" index card with a word or two identifying that person (Grandma, Um’ma (Uncle) George, and so on).  This is a great opportunity to reinforce Chaldean family words, colors, and common objects with your toddler.  Kids love to look at pictures, and it will also help your child remember who's who.

2. Custom Post Cards.
With the extra 4" x 6" index cards create postcards.  Let your child draw or paint a picture on one side, then turn it over and ask write a message together that you can send to a loved one. Add the address and a stamp, and you're sure to brighten someone's day.

3. Paper Garden.
Kids love crafts.  The tactile learning helps improve their skills and keeps their attention.  A paper garden is a great idea to get those creative and critical thinking juices flowing.  Using safe pinking shears or other decorative scissors cut flower shaped blossoms out of brightly colored construction paper, then tape onto a drinking straw. Set bouquets in vases around the house.  You can try different designs.  Let your child give them to others.   

4. Shape or Color Week.
Dedicate a week to a color or a shape. On red day, dress your little one in a red shirt. At breakfast, point out all the red vegetables, fruits, or markings on products. During shape week point out all the various things made up of the shape you have chosen.  Walk around the house and point out all the red things or circles you see.   It's a great way for kids to learn their colors and shapes and it gives organization to the day.

5. Build a Shoebox House.
Use some of those old shoe boxes to build a house.  Cut out a door and some windows, make curtains out of fabric scraps, draw or paint pictures to hang on the walls, and put swatches of old clothes inside for a carpet. You can also attach boxes of different sizes to create a mansion.

6. Wind Chimes.
Find some yarn or fishing line and string beads, bells, and other noise-making objects onto them. Tie the other end onto a wire hanger twisted into a circle.  Be sure to tie the strings closely enough so the objects strike each other and make music when the breeze blows. Hang the chimes on your porch or in a tree, and listen for the soothing sounds from inside the house.  Whenever the chimes make a sound give each other a hug. 

7. Create a Home Book.
Create an "I can" book with your child. Cut out pictures of things she can do (eat, ride a brike, get dressed, brush her teeth) from old magazines and glue them onto sheets of construction paper and then make holes with a three-hole punch and use a colorful ribbon or yarn to bind the book.  You can also have your child tell you a story and together draw or cut out pictures to go with it.

8. Create a Concert.
Build your own instruments, and have a concert for the family. Be creative and let your imagination run wild.  For a great sound, put crunchy cereal between two aluminum pie plates stapled together, shake rice in a soda can, or make a drum out of an empty cardboard oatmeal container (use a wooden spoon for a drum-stick).

9. Build a Cushion Fort.
Find big boxes or take the cushions off the sofa and build crawling tunnels by stacking the cushions and assembling boxes.  Use bed sheets to drape over the openings.  Create twists and turns and add little holes and window flaps for your child to look through.