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Entries for September 2008

Research Reveals Parents of Private Schools over 80% Happy and Public School Rank Low 40%
By CE&CC :: 77882 Views :: Article Rating :: Career & Education, Chaldean Education & Career Center

Parents of children who attend private schools are more satisfied with their schools than parents of children in public education settings, according to a new report from the National Center for Education Statistics, while parents whose children attend the public school of their choice are more satisfied than those whose children attend an assigned public school.

"Parent and Family Involvement in Education, 2006-2007 School Year," said that 82 percent of parents whose children attended a private, nonreligious school and 81 percent whose children attended a private religious school described themselves as "very satisfied" with their schools, compared to 55 percent of parents whose children attend an assigned public school and 63 percent of those whose children attend a public school of their choice.

Released in August, the report is based on telephone interviews with parents conducted in the first half of 2007 on a wide range of topics: school satisfaction, parental involvement in schools, school-parent communication, satisfaction with teachers, discipline and homework levels. While the specific numbers varied, more private school parents than public school parents were very satisfied with teachers, academic standards, discipline, and school/parent interaction.

Other findings:

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Chaldean Caucus of Michigan to Host Presidential Debate Gathering and Discussion
By Neda Ayar :: 95574 Views :: Article Rating :: Career & Education, Government & Society, Chaldean Caucus

Surrogates from both the McCain and Obama camp have approached Chaldean community leaders hoping to gain their support.  In Michigan, issue advocates like CatholicVote.com have reached out to Chaldeans with a special issue announcement.    

The Chaldean Caucus of Michigan will be hosting the first presidential debate viewing at Mother of God Church Hall in Southfield, Michigan this Friday, September 26th beginning at 7:30 p.m.  Supporters of both candidates are invited to attend.  Refreshments will be served and lively discussion will follow immediately after the debate, moderated by Chaldean Caucus regional leaders. 

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10 Tips on How to Handle Chaldean Family Business Conflict
By Ray Yono :: 107751 Views :: Article Rating :: Career & Education, Community & Culture, Business & Finance

Chaldean family businesses present a unique set of conflict resolution strategies at the workplace.  Conflicts at home or at the business, whether they’re interpersonal or purely business, are an unavoidable fact of the Chaldean family business life.

 But a disagreement doesn’t have to end with hardship and hurt feelings. Employing smart psychology can help younger Chaldeans handle conflict wisely with their seniors and end up with a solution that works best for everyone.

Dr. Nabil Rafou, a Chaldean social psychologist who is an expert in conflict resolution, negotiation, mediation and leadership, shares some of the tactics that work among Chaldean family businesses.  “These ten tips work particularly well given the Chaldean cultures blended history,” Dr. Rafou says.  

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Villanova University Rescues Iraqi Chaldean Family with Education Opportunity
By CE&CC :: 80194 Views :: Article Rating :: Career & Education, Chaldean Education & Career Center

Maryland, USA  - Habib Habib.  Sounds like a musical, but the story of the Neumann College freshman with the duplicative name reads more like a documentary.

Habib came to the United States in 2005 as part of a youth exchange and scholarship program, living in San Diego with his aunt while attending school.  Typically, students return home after one academic year, but in Habib's case, home meant Iraq, where his Catholic family had been living in fear of extremists since the U.S.-led invasion in 2003.

That fear intensified when word began to spread in Baghdad that Habib was not, as his family claimed, studying in neighboring Jordan but rather in the U.S.  "When word got out, I was forced to stay in the U.S.," said Habib, who was granted asylum in 2006. "It was too dangerous to go home. I would be dead."

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