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Chaldean Flame-Seared Asian Spicy Kebabs
By Ann Bahri :: Sunday, May 6, 2012 :: 81498 Views :: Article Rating :: Living & Lifestyle, Community & Culture
Since many Chaldeans have been forced to flee their land, it is not uncommon to find Chaldeans experimenting on new foods that are reminiscent of home with an accepting flavor of their new lands.  The new foods are often a mixture that includes traditional Chaldean meals or cooking styles adapted to their host countries.  

The term shish kebab comes from the word kebab, which originally meant fried not grilled meat. The Arabic word was derived from Aramaic kabbābā, which has its origins in Akkadian kabābu meaning "to burn, char".

Kebabs were a natural solution for Chaldean nomadic tribes. Unusual meats were marinated not only to tenderize, but also to get rid of some of the gamey flavor.  Skewers were easy to find in the wilderness as useful utensils for both revolving the meat and easy eating.  

In America, younger Chaldeans have learned to turn Mom’s traditional cooking into an assortment of new dishes.  Try this flame-seared Asian spicy kebab that has a sweet and spicy kick. 

Ingredients

  • 1½ lbs. rib eye steaks (about half inch thick)
  • 1½ tsp. ground cumin
  • 1½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tbs. ground turmeric
  • 3 tbs. soy sauce
  • 3 tbs. vegetable oil
  • 3 tbs. light brown sugar
  • 2 tbs. ground coriander

Directions

1) Cut steaks into ½ inch cubes (do not trim fat).  Place in mixing bowl.  Stir in brown sugar, coriander, turmeric, cumin, pepper, soy sauce, and oil.  Let beef marinate in refrigerator, covered, for at least 2 hours.

2) Drain beef cubes; discard marinade.  Thread beef onto skewers and refrigerate until ready to grill.  

3) Preheat grill to high.  When ready to cook, brush grill grate clean and apply thin coat of oil.  Arrange skewers on the grill and cook to taste (usually 1 to 2 minutes per side for medium-rare, a little longer for medium.

Chaldean shish kebabs have expanded into most cultures in some form or another. Oriental cultures have satay, which are roasted skewered meats served with a dipping sauce usually made with peanuts.  Japan has yakitori, which is grilled skewered fowl. In France, they are called brochettes, meaning "skewer."

 

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St. Thomas, MI USA

St. Thomas Chaldean Catholic Church
6900 Maple Rd.
West Bloomfield, MI 48322
Tel: (248) 788-2460
Fax: (248) 788-2153

Founding Pastor:
Rev. Hanna Cheikho

Current Pastor:
Rev. Frank Kalabat

Parochial Vicar:
Rev. Jirjis Abrahim

Rev. Emmanuel Rayes, Retired  


Rev. Frank Kalabat
 

Rev. Frank Kalabat was born in 1970 in San Diego, California and entered St. Francis Seminary of San Diego, California.  The admission to the Catholic seminary made him the first born U.S. Chaldean to enter an American seminary.  In 1992, Fr. Kalabat continued his studies at Sacred Heart Major Seminary in Detroit, Michigan.  In July 1995, shortly after graduation he was ordained as priest by His Excellency Bishop Ibrahim N. Ibrahim.  

Fr. Frank chose Mother of God Parish in Southfield, MI. as his first assignment serving the Chaldean community as an associate pastor for half a decade.  In 2001, Fr. Kalabat was elected to serve as Pastor of St. Tomas Parish in West Bloomfield, Michigan where he remains today.   

Rev. Jirjis Abrahim

Rev. Jirjis Abrahim was born in Telkaif, Iraq in 1942. Upon graduation Fr. Abrahim was admitted to St. Peter Chaldean Seminary in Baghdad, Iraq.  After a decade of studies and numerous degrees, Fr. Abrhim was ordained a priest in 1967.  He chose to continue ministering in Baghdad, Iraq.  There he was appointed the headmaster of the catechism at Mother of Sorrows Cathedral.  Fr. Abrahim also assisted St. Therese Church in Baghdad until 1978.  Afterward he was asked to assist St. Joseph Church in Baghdad and was appointed Parochial Vicar from 1978-1992. 

In 1992, Fr. Abrahim was called upon to assist the growing Chaldean population in Michigan.  Upon his arrival he was assigned to St. Joseph Church in Tory, Michigan.  Two years later Fr. Abrahim was asked to become the pastor of a Parish community in Windsor, Canada  where he remained the parish pastor until 2001.

Continuing demographic changes in Michigan required Fr. Abrahim to return to St. Joseph Parish in Tory as a Parochial Vicar, where he remained until 2006.  In 2006 he was elected to St. Thomas Parish as Parochial Vicar in West Bloomfield, MI. where he currently serves the Chaldean community.

 

Rev. Emmanuel Rayes

Rev. Emmanuel Rays was born in Araden, Iraq in 1930.  He studied at St. John Dominican Seminary and was ordained to the priesthood in 1954.  The Chaldean catholic ambassador ministered in northern Iraq from 1954-1963, in Syria and Lebanon from 1963-1980, and in the United Stated from 1980 to the present day.
 
Form 1980-1983, he was appointed associate pastor at Mother of God Parish in Southfield, Michigan.  From 1983-1989 he served as pastor at Sacred Heart Parish in Detroit, Michigan.  During the early 1990’s he ministered to the Chaldean community in Farmington Hills and was at St. Joseph Parish in Tory where he was Parochial Vicar until 2000.

Although Fr. Rayes retired in 2001, he remains active in serving the community.  He is the author of many articles in Arabic and is the editor-in-chief of the Al Mishal and Al-Tariq magazine.  He has translated and continues to translate many books from French and English into Arabic.