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Kill Christians! Islamic Fundamentalists Chant in Iraq After Murdering Three
By Amer Hedow :: Thursday, October 9, 2008 :: 100412 Views :: Article Rating :: Law & Order, Government & Society, World News & Odds 'N' Ends

Mosul, IRAQ – Another tragic killing of Christians in Mosul today.  Al Qaeda militants gunned down Chaldean Jalal Moussa, 38, and three other Chaldeans in front of their homes in the neighborhood of Noor.  Islamic militants have been terrorizing the city with shouts and nailing posters urging attacks against Christians, threatening more slaughter and violence and urging U.S. military to leave. 

Little has been covered by world media as major news outlets refuse to cover the ongoing Christian attacks.  In less than seven days, nine Christians have been murdered because of their faith.  Asia News reveals an organized campaign is underway to drive Christians out of the region.  The news reports a car with a loudspeaker went around the streets in the neighborhood of Sukkar, ordering the Christians to leave." "Christians out of the city," the people on board were shouting, "otherwise you will be victims of more attacks."

Iraqi Christians have come under the brutal attacks of Islamic militants with little or any protection from the Iraqi government.  Many are saying the attacks are an attempt to drive Christians out of the country or herded into abysmal lands where they can be easily targeted.  Recent exclusion from having representation in the upcoming election is reinforcing the sentiment that the indigenous people of Iraq are being stripped and killed. 

Asisa News reports that the Christians murdered ere owners of stores and commercial activities in Mosul, a clear signal that the terrorists intend to wipe out the economic activity of Christians, forcing the population to leave.   According to some witnesses, before shooting the terrorists accused the Christians of "wanting to create an enclave in Nineveh," and then proceeded with the execution in cold blood.

U.S. General Mark Hertling, commander of US troops in northern Iraq says “"Al Qaeda is trying to get a foothold in Iraq and Mosul is the base of operations that they have chosen for launching their attacks," with the infiltration of foreign militants from Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Yemen, and Pakistan, through the Syrian border.

The herding of Christians into a small village is strongly opposed by the Chaldean Church.  The church fears the coerced placement of Iraqi Christians will result into systematic discrimination and attacks.  Archbishop Lous Sako of Kirkuk described in 2007 that dividing the people of Iraq would create more violence and further hatred.  For Christians the areas would be transformed into a sort of ghetto for shutting up refugees fleeing from Baghdad, Mosul, Kirkuk, and Basra.  The danger is that the area would fast become a lawless ghetto whereby criminals would attack Christians with impunity and no fear of the law arresting them.

Archbishop Sako says the area would be "a breeding ground for revolts, clashes, and social tensions, as is taking place today in Palestine." For this reason, the Church has always promoted "coexistence under the banner of peace and mutual respect," among populations that are "rooted by history and tradition in the Iraqi homeland."

Violence in Mosul in recent weeks has driven an increasing number of people to leave the city. According to estimates by local Christians, "every week more than 20 families decide to flee." This exodus has "emptied entire neighborhoods" of Christians, "to the indifference of the media and of Western governments."

On Monday, October 6, Ziad Kamal, a disabled 25-year-old shopkeeper in the city, was shot to death. The young man's store was in the neighborhood of Karam.  Before him, armed groups assassinated Hazim Thomaso Youssif, age 40. The ambush took place in front of his clothing store in Bab Sarray.  On the same day, 15-year-old Ivan Nuwya, also a Christian, was killed. The young man was shot to death in front of his home in the neighborhood of Tahrir, in front of the local mosque of Alzhara.

The Christian community lives in panic as the slaughter continues "to the indifference" of the media, which "do not even report the crimes that are committed."

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St. Thomas, MI USA

St. Thomas Chaldean Catholic Church
6900 Maple Rd.
West Bloomfield, MI 48322
Tel: (248) 788-2460
Fax: (248) 788-2153

Founding Pastor:
Rev. Hanna Cheikho

Current Pastor:
Rev. Frank Kalabat

Parochial Vicar:
Rev. Jirjis Abrahim

Rev. Emmanuel Rayes, Retired  


Rev. Frank Kalabat
 

Rev. Frank Kalabat was born in 1970 in San Diego, California and entered St. Francis Seminary of San Diego, California.  The admission to the Catholic seminary made him the first born U.S. Chaldean to enter an American seminary.  In 1992, Fr. Kalabat continued his studies at Sacred Heart Major Seminary in Detroit, Michigan.  In July 1995, shortly after graduation he was ordained as priest by His Excellency Bishop Ibrahim N. Ibrahim.  

Fr. Frank chose Mother of God Parish in Southfield, MI. as his first assignment serving the Chaldean community as an associate pastor for half a decade.  In 2001, Fr. Kalabat was elected to serve as Pastor of St. Tomas Parish in West Bloomfield, Michigan where he remains today.   

Rev. Jirjis Abrahim

Rev. Jirjis Abrahim was born in Telkaif, Iraq in 1942. Upon graduation Fr. Abrahim was admitted to St. Peter Chaldean Seminary in Baghdad, Iraq.  After a decade of studies and numerous degrees, Fr. Abrhim was ordained a priest in 1967.  He chose to continue ministering in Baghdad, Iraq.  There he was appointed the headmaster of the catechism at Mother of Sorrows Cathedral.  Fr. Abrahim also assisted St. Therese Church in Baghdad until 1978.  Afterward he was asked to assist St. Joseph Church in Baghdad and was appointed Parochial Vicar from 1978-1992. 

In 1992, Fr. Abrahim was called upon to assist the growing Chaldean population in Michigan.  Upon his arrival he was assigned to St. Joseph Church in Tory, Michigan.  Two years later Fr. Abrahim was asked to become the pastor of a Parish community in Windsor, Canada  where he remained the parish pastor until 2001.

Continuing demographic changes in Michigan required Fr. Abrahim to return to St. Joseph Parish in Tory as a Parochial Vicar, where he remained until 2006.  In 2006 he was elected to St. Thomas Parish as Parochial Vicar in West Bloomfield, MI. where he currently serves the Chaldean community.

 

Rev. Emmanuel Rayes

Rev. Emmanuel Rays was born in Araden, Iraq in 1930.  He studied at St. John Dominican Seminary and was ordained to the priesthood in 1954.  The Chaldean catholic ambassador ministered in northern Iraq from 1954-1963, in Syria and Lebanon from 1963-1980, and in the United Stated from 1980 to the present day.
 
Form 1980-1983, he was appointed associate pastor at Mother of God Parish in Southfield, Michigan.  From 1983-1989 he served as pastor at Sacred Heart Parish in Detroit, Michigan.  During the early 1990’s he ministered to the Chaldean community in Farmington Hills and was at St. Joseph Parish in Tory where he was Parochial Vicar until 2000.

Although Fr. Rayes retired in 2001, he remains active in serving the community.  He is the author of many articles in Arabic and is the editor-in-chief of the Al Mishal and Al-Tariq magazine.  He has translated and continues to translate many books from French and English into Arabic.