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Chaldean Flame-Seared Asian Spicy Kebabs
By Ann Bahri :: Sunday, May 6, 2012 :: 65964 Views :: Living & Lifestyle, Community & Culture
Since many Chaldeans have been forced to flee their land, it is not uncommon to find Chaldeans experimenting on new foods that are reminiscent of home with an accepting flavor of their new lands.  The new foods are often a mixture that includes traditional Chaldean meals or cooking styles adapted to their host countries.  

The term shish kebab comes from the word kebab, which originally meant fried not grilled meat. The Arabic word was derived from Aramaic kabbābā, which has its origins in Akkadian kabābu meaning "to burn, char".

Kebabs were a natural solution for Chaldean nomadic tribes. Unusual meats were marinated not only to tenderize, but also to get rid of some of the gamey flavor.  Skewers were easy to find in the wilderness as useful utensils for both revolving the meat and easy eating.  

In America, younger Chaldeans have learned to turn Mom’s traditional cooking into an assortment of new dishes.  Try this flame-seared Asian spicy kebab that has a sweet and spicy kick. 

Ingredients

  • 1½ lbs. rib eye steaks (about half inch thick)
  • 1½ tsp. ground cumin
  • 1½ tsp. freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tbs. ground turmeric
  • 3 tbs. soy sauce
  • 3 tbs. vegetable oil
  • 3 tbs. light brown sugar
  • 2 tbs. ground coriander

Directions

1) Cut steaks into ½ inch cubes (do not trim fat).  Place in mixing bowl.  Stir in brown sugar, coriander, turmeric, cumin, pepper, soy sauce, and oil.  Let beef marinate in refrigerator, covered, for at least 2 hours.

2) Drain beef cubes; discard marinade.  Thread beef onto skewers and refrigerate until ready to grill.  

3) Preheat grill to high.  When ready to cook, brush grill grate clean and apply thin coat of oil.  Arrange skewers on the grill and cook to taste (usually 1 to 2 minutes per side for medium-rare, a little longer for medium.

Chaldean shish kebabs have expanded into most cultures in some form or another. Oriental cultures have satay, which are roasted skewered meats served with a dipping sauce usually made with peanuts.  Japan has yakitori, which is grilled skewered fowl. In France, they are called brochettes, meaning "skewer."

 

St. Joseph, MI USA

St. Joseph Chaldean Catholic Church
2442 E. Big Beaver Rd.
Troy, MI 48083
Tel: (248) 528-3676
Fax: (248) 524-1957

Congregation Organizer:
Rev. Michael J. Bazzi

Church Constructing Pastor:
Rev. Sarhad Y. Jammo

Current Pastor:
Msgr. Zouhair Toma

Parochial Vicar:
Rev. Ayad Hanna

 Current Pastor: Msgr. Zouhair Toma

Msgr. Zouhair Toma (Kejbou) was born in Telkaif, Iraq in 1947.  He was ordained a priest in Baghdad, Iraq in 1968, and accepted his first assignment to serve the community of Baquba.  The Monsignor’s leadership skills and organizational talents along with his mastery of theology were immediately evident.  He later assisted Sts. Peter and Paul in Al-Salehia, and St. George in New Baghdad.

In August, 1978 Monsignor Toma was called to serve the growing community of persecuted Chaldeans finding refuge in Australia.   Being the fist Chaldean priest to arrive in Australia he quickly established a parish for the Chaldeans in Sydney to serve their social and spiritual needs.  The parish was named after St. Thomas the Apostle and built a rectory. 

In 1989, for his incredible work he was granted the title of Monsignor, Chaldean Patriarchal Vicar for Australia and New Zealand.  Continuing his passionate work to serve the Chaldean community the Monsignor moved the Parish Center to a more accessible location and built a large church campus featuring a modern community center, residence quarters, and administrative offices in 1995. 

In 2003, Monsignor Toma added a magnificent church to replace the previous one in order to serve the fast growing community and also opened two other centers.  The first was Our Lady Guardian of Plants in Melbourne, and the second was Mar Addai the Apostle in Auckland, New Zealand.  Mar Addai in New Zealand included two very large churches along with rectories and community centers.  Overseeing the Patriarchal Vicariate for 28 years, he managed to inspire six more priests to help minister to the fast growing Chaldean community. 

In August 2006, Monsignor chose to assist the St. Thomas the Apostle Diocese in the U.S. as more Catholic churches were being built in America and address the growing need.  On October 2006, Monsignor was incardinated and appointed Pastor of St. Joseph Parish in Troy.