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To My Little Sister: You Are My Sunshine!
By Frank Dado :: Wednesday, October 29, 2008 :: 32113 Views :: Health & Fitness, Living & Lifestyle, Religion & Spirituality

You are My Sunshine, My only Sunshine'….Like any good mother, when Karen found out that another baby was on the way, she did what she could to help her 3-year-old son, Michael, prepare for a new sibling.

They found out that the new baby was going be a girl, and day after day, night after night, Michael sang to his sister in mommy's tummy.   He was building a bond of love with his little sister before he even met her.

The pregnancy progressed normally for Karen.  In time, the labor pains came. Soon it was every five minutes, every three, every minute. But serious complications arose during delivery and Karen found herself in hours of labor.

Would a C-section be required? Would the mother survive?  Would the baby live?  The entire family and medical staff were on pins and needles.  Finally, after a long and exhausting struggle, Michael's little sister was born. But she was in very serious condition.

The hospital did not have the facility to address the condition.  An ambulance was called to rush Karen to a special hospital.  The siren howling in the night, the ambulance rushed the infant to the neonatal intensive care unit. 

The days inched by. The little girl got worse. The pediatrician had to tell the parents there is very little hope. “Be prepared for the worst,” he said.  The words weighed heavy on the family.  

Karen and her husband contacted a local cemetery about a burial plot.  They had fixed up a special room in their house for their new baby, but now they found themselves having to plan for a funeral. Michael, however, kept begging his parents to let him see his sister.

“I want to sing to her,” he kept saying.

Michael’s baby sister was getting worse.  Week two in intensive care looked as if a funeral would come before the week was over.

Michael kept nagging about singing to his sister, but kids are never allowed in Intensive Care. Karen decided to take Michael whether they liked it or not.

If he didn't see his sister right then, he may never see her alive. She dressed him in an oversized scrub suit and marched him into ICU. He looked like a walking laundry basket.

The head nurse recognized him as a child and bellowed, “Get that kid out of here now. No children are allowed.” The mother rose up strong in Karen, and the usually mild-mannered lady glared steel-eyed right into the head nurse's face, her lips a firm line. 'He is not leaving until he sings to his sister' she barked back.  Her emotions pouring out in the heartache she was feeling.

Karen towed Michael to his sister's bedside. He gazed at the tiny infant losing the battle to live.  Michael, oblivious to all the tubes, dials, and pumps tied to his baby sister began to sing.  His excitement to see his baby sister was unquestionable. 

In the pure-hearted voice of a 3-year-old, Michael sang:

”You are my sunshine, my only sunshine, you make me happy when skies are gray.”  Instantly the baby girl seemed to respond. Her pulse rate began to calm down and become steady.

”Keep on singing, Michael,” encouraged Karen with tears in her eyes.

”You never know, dear, how much I love you, please don't take my sunshine away.” As Michael sang to his sister, his baby sister’s ragged, strained breathing became as smooth as a kitten's purr. 

Even Michael noticed the change.  He paused as if he did something wrong and innocently turned to his mom as if he made some sort of mistake. 

“Keep on singing, sweetheart,” Michaels mother nudged, reassuring him it was okay.

”The other night, dear, as I lay sleeping, I dreamed I held you in my arms.”  Michael's little sister began to relax as rest, healing rest, seemed to sweep over her.

”Keep on singing, Michael,” Karens cracked voice whispered.  Tears were pouring down her face and quietly the bossy head nurse stood in the doorway wiping tears from her eyes as well.

Michael glowed as he sung to his baby sister.   “You are my sunshine, my only sunshine. Please don't take my sunshine away..”

The next day...the very next day the little girl was well enough to go home. 

Woman's Day Magazine called it The Miracle of a Brother's Song.  The medical staff just called it a miracle.  Karen called it a miracle of God's love.

The innocence of one child pierced the heart of the most hardened and skeptical people in that hospital.  Michael’s love for his baby sister affirms to us all that we should never give up on the people we love.

 

Editorial note:  There are touching stories that we love to receive at www.CHALDEAN.org.  These inspirational messages for the soul help many of our readers make it through a difficult day.  We ask all our readers that when you receive a touching e-mail that has moved you, made you laugh, or given you moment to pause, please be sure to include info@chaldean.org in your forward. 

To make the message more meaningful and to protect the innocent we do change the names and vary the venue a bit, but always strive to keep the core of the story true to its purpose. We do hope such stories, some fictional and some quite true, help give you the soulful vitamins we all lack. As always, we do ask you share these medicinal stories with those you love. 


St. George, MI USA
St. George Chaldean Catholic Church
45700 Dequinder Rd.,
Shelby Twp., MI 48317
Tel: (586) 254-7221
Fax: (586) 254-2874
 
Pastor: Rev.
Emanuel Shaleta
Parochial Vicar:
Rev. Basel Yaldo

Rev. Emanuel Shaleta 
Rev. Emanuel Hana Isho Shaleta was born in the village of Peshabur in northern Iraq. After completing his primary education he applied and was admitted in September 1971, to the illustrious St. John Seminary in Mosul, Iraq. In 1977 Rev. Shaleta was awarded a scholarship to study philosophy and theology in the renowned Urbaniana Pontifical University in Rome. There he obtained a Ph.D. in Biblical Theology. 
 
The reverends impressive work earned him the honor to be ordained to the priesthood by the hands of Pope John Paul II, in St. Peter Basilica in Rome on May 31, 1984. 
 
On June 3, 1987, Fr. Shaleta was assigned to serve as pastor for St. Paul Assyrian Chaldean Catholic Church in North Hollywood, California, where he served for just about a decade and a half. 
 
In December 2000, Fr. Shaleta was called to assist St. Jospeh Catholic Chaldean Church in Troy, Michigan and shortly thereafter was appointed pastor in 2002. Fr. Shaleta’s impressive leadership merited a unanimous appointment as the first pastor of St. George Chaldean Catholic Church, in Shelby Twp. Michigan, billed as the largest Chaldean church in the world. Fr. Shaleta continues to this day to impressively lead the faithful and offer wonderful opportunities and service to the community. 
 
Rev. Basel Yaldo
 
Rev. Basel Yaldo was born in Telkaif, Iraq in 1970. Rev. Yaldo graduated from the National Teachers College in Iraq in 1989 and was drafted in the army in 1990. In 1993, he was honorably discharged for his service. A year later Rev. Yaldo was admitted to Babel College in Baghdad to study philosophy and theology. There Fr. Yaldo, received a scholarship to study in Rome at Urban College, where he completed his bachelor’s degree in theology in 2001. 
 
On November 23, 2002, Fr. Yaldo was ordained a priest by His Excellency Bishop Ibrahim N. Ibrahim, Bishop of the Diocese of St. Thomas the Apostle for the Chaldeans. Fr. Yaldo continued his studies whereby he completed a masters degree in Dogmatic Theology with a focus on Marian studies from Urban College in 2003. 
 
The following year he was appointed assistant director of the seminary in the Dora district of Baghdad, and taught Dogmatic Theology at Babel College. His commanding leadership and steadfast skills earned him the secretarial appointment to Patriarch Emanuel III Delly. Upon completion of his duties as patriarchal secretary, Fr. Yaldo was nominated and selected as assistant pastor to St. George Chaldean Catholic Church Shelby Township, Michigan.