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Chaldean Healthcare Provider Sees Shift in Culture Costing A Great Deal
By Britney Hermiz :: Tuesday, November 4, 2008 :: 79228 Views :: Health & Fitness, Government & Society

Florida, USA – “The family is the nucleus of society.  When it is weakened or destroyed, we all pay,” says Jenny Jabril, a Chaldean nurse in Florida’s Orange County.  “We all pay when families break-down or fail.  We the people, deal with the dysfunction.  Our taxes go up to care for the abandoned or misguided children, our education system spins out of control, we pay more to prevent crimes, protect our families, or hospitalize these people.” 

Jabril is frustrated over the increased number of substance abuse.  In Florida law, citizens can be held against their will under the Marchman Act. Individuals whose substance abuse makes them a threat to themselves or others can be held at a mental-health facility for up to five days while physicians evaluate them.

Jerry Kassab, president and chief executive officer of Lakeside Alternatives, Orange County's receiving center, said his facility receives about 20 patients a day who are committed under the law.   There are three scenarios in which someone can be committed under the Marchman Act.

In Orange County, Kassab said, most patients are taken to Lakeside by law enforcement officers.  "The most common instance is when someone's out on the street who's acting up, or the police might be called by a store owner because someone's acting up or acting weird," Kassab said. "You also get instances when one family member calls the police because someone in their family is out of control."

That number has increased during the past five years, Kassab said, as law-enforcement culture has shifted toward the belief a hospital is better than a jail.  "This doesn't show up on their records," Kassab said. "It's a good thing to have them receive treatment rather than jail."

Patients can also be committed by a licensed mental-health counselor or physician. According to Kassab, family members sometimes come to Lakeside with patients who don't want to enter the facility voluntarily. If they meet the criteria for involuntary commitment, the center's staff can commit them.

A family member or friend also can seek a court order for someone to be committed. To do that, an individual fills out a petition form and signs it under oath at a county clerk's office. A judge then decides, based solely on the petition, whether the patient meets the criteria.  If the petition is persuasive, the judge enters an order and informs law enforcement officers, who take the patient to a receiving center.

The goal of the Marchman Act commitments is to evaluate patients and persuade them to enter an outpatient treatment program.  "We sit down with them and try to set up an appointment and a plan that they'll keep, but so many don't, and that's just a fact of it," Kassab said.

After the designated evaluation period has passed, physicians at the receiving center can petition the court to hold a patient longer, often just for a few days; but in a few instances, they may ask the court for permission to move the patient to a state-run hospital.

In both instances, the hearings usually take place right at the receiving center, and the patient is represented by a public defender.

"The public defender is very opposed many times, because they believe it's a violation of their civil rights," Kassab said. "Our doctors want to keep them because they believe it's in their best interest."

When the court does decide in the favor of the receiving center, the patient's lawyer often appeals the ruling -- and usually the appeals court will side with the patient, Lenderman said.

Jabril says, “It's a balancing act between a person's liberty and their safety and the safety of the community.  All of this has come about because of the family breaking down. Our healthcare costs have skyrocketed and it has forced other families to pay for the lack of personal responsibility by those who are alcoholic, using drugs, or becoming mentally ill due to a parents STD.”

Mother of God Church, MI USA

 

Mother of God Chaldean Catholic Church
25585 Berg Road
Southfield, MI 48033
Tel: (248) 356-0565
Fax: (248) 356-5235
Email:
MotherOfGodChurch@yahoo.com

Founding Pastor:
Msgr. Geroge Garmo in 1972
The current church building
was completed in 1980.

Pastor:
Rev.  Manuel Yousif Boji

Parochial Vicar:
Rev. Wisam Matti
 


 MASS SCHEDULE
Daily:  10:00 AM Chaldean
Tuesdays:  5:30 PM Chaldean/English 
Saturdays:  Ramsha 4:45-5:20 PM; Mass 5:30 PM Chaldean   
Sundays:  8:30 AM Arabic, 10:00 AM English, 12:00 PM Chaldean

 1st Friday, Sodality Prayers 11 AM – 12 PM
1st Saturday, Immaculate Heart Sodality Prayers 4:00 PM

TEAM NAME:
Mother of God Guardian Angels

SERVICES:
Communion & Catechism School
Chaldean Language School
Hall Rental
Wedding Services
Baptism Services
Funeral Services

CHURCH GROUPS:
Monday: Family Bible Study 8:00 P.M. Upper Hall
Friday: Young Adult English Bible Study 7:30 P.M. Lower Hall
Wednesday: Young Adult Arabic Bible Study 7:30 P.M. Lower Hall
Prayer Groups
Our Lady Social
Ur of the Chaldees
Knights of Columbus
Mass Servers
Youth Choir
Adult Choir
Family Fun Friday
Friday Friends
Communications Ministry
Chaldean Teens Coming Together
Performance Ministry
Gift Store
Library and Research
Social Ministry & Support
Chaldean Language Classes
Fishers of Men
 


 Rev. Manuel Yousif Boji

Fr. Manuel was born in Telkaif in the suburbs of Nineveh, Iraq in 1946.   Reverend Manuel Boji entered the Chaldean Seminary in Mousl in 1958 and was ordained a priest in Baghdad in 1968.  His first assignment was in Telkaif where he served for 19 years.  In July 1987, Fr. Manuel was assigned  to the United States  where he assisted Mar Addai Parish in Oak Park, Michigan for six months.  From March 1988 until April 1990, he was administrator of Sacred Heart Parish in Detroit, Michigan.  Fr. Manuel completed his Masters and Doctorate work from both U of D Mercy and Wayne State University while assigned to the United States.  In May 1990, Fr. Manuel was assigned to Mother of God Parish and is currently serving there as Rector of the Cathedral. 

Parochial Vicar: Rev. Wisam Matti

Fr. Wisam was born in Basrah, Iraq on October 30, 1971. Completing his education in Iraq and serving in the military Fr. Wisam then entered the Chaldean Seminary in Baghdad in 1984.  He was ordained a priest in Karemlees a suburb of Nineveh on July 4th 1997.  His first assignment was in Mosul where he served for five years.  On January 21, 2002, Fr. Wisam was transferred to the Unites States and was assigned to Mother of God Parish where he is currently serving as parochial vicar.  Fr. Wisam, earned his Master in Pastoral Theology on April 28, 2007 from Sacred Heart Major Seminary in Detroit, Michigan. 

PARISH COUNCIL: